Finnish Passenger Ship To Be Powered By Turbo Power & Marine Systems Gas Turbines

finnish passenger ship to be powered by
turbo power  marine systems gas turbines

A $5-million contract for a marine gas turbine propulsion system designed to speed a new Finnlines passenger ship between Helsinki, Finland, and West Germany in half the time it now takes, has been awarded t o Turbo Power & Marine Systems, Farmington, Conn., a subsidiary of United Aircraft Corporation. The contract was awarded 'by the Oy Wartsila Ab Shipyard in Helsinki, which will 'build the ship for Enso-iGutzeit Osakeyhtio, Finland's largest concern and parent company of Finnlines. The Finnjet will begin serving Baltic Sea traffic in 1977. Finnjet is designed to carry 1,500 passengers and up to 220 cars and 30 trucks; it is being built to operate year-round and through ice. Turbo Power & Marine Systems will supply two Pratt & Whitney Aircraft FT4C-1D gas turbines, a spare gas generator and other associated equipment, with delivery scheduled for December 1975. The turbines will provide a total of 75,- 000-horsepower for a normal speed of 30.5 knots, and will reduce the 44-hour travel time to 22 hours between Helsinki and Travemunde, adjacent to Kiel, 'Germany.

This is TPM's first sale to a European passenger line. The company has gas turbines operational in 12 U.S. Coast Guard cutters, six Canadian and Danish Navies' destroyer escorts, and four commercial ships owned by Seatrain Lines, a New York shipping firm.

The 692-foot-long Finnjet will be able to transport 350,000 passengers annually between Finland and West Germany to expand Finland's rapidly increasing tourist trade. Goods shipped from either country will arrive at the destination port the following day.

The TPM contract was negotiated through United Aircraft International, also a subsidiary of United Aircraft Corporation. Pratt & Whitney Aircraft is a division of United Aircraft.

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